Start Meld dating sites

Meld dating sites

Image Source: Meld With the influx of online dating sites and apps available to singles, meeting someone has become (seemingly) easier than ever.

Similarly, knowing common friends and interests care of Facebook gives you valuable insights you might not otherwise discover for a few dates.

The mutual-acceptance programming means you’re only contacted by people you’re interested in, eliminating the bother of unwanted advances that burden real life and online dating.

The Meld mission is to bring these disparate groups of Black professionals onto a single platform for social and romantic discovery.

On one hand, the first mobile dating app for the African Diaspora is both clever and timely.

There are plenty of dating apps out there that serve a bunch of different segments, but none are catering to the black professional,” says Ayeni.

“The premise of MELD is that we are creating a platform for black professionals to date and to mingle and to provide an avenue where you can find like-minded people.” With Valentine’s Day approaching, Madame Noire spoke with the co-founders of MELD to discuss their dating app, the stigma of online dating in the Black community and how you can snag a date this Valentine’s Day weekend.

What she fails to note, however, is how factors like race can have a significant impact on how millennials navigate apps that are supposed to help us find love.

Like Tinder, this mobile application uses your Facebook name, age, photos of your choice, mutual friends and the pages you’ve liked to create a member profile.

“Where you work and what you do is a big part of who you are, it is where you spend most of your time.” Raïssa Tona and Wale Ayeni met while pursuing MBAs at Dartmouth College’s Tuck School of Business, and came up with the idea for this platform to fill a void they saw amongst their peers who were underwhelmed by their online dating experiences.

According to research from dating site Ok Cupid, men often don’t write Black women back when it comes to first-contact attempts, even when Black women write back the most.

The brand is currently building its membership by targeting Black professional organizations like National Black MBA Association, the National Society of Black Engineers, the National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ) and HBCUs. “Unlike most dating sites, all of our profiles are actual people,” explains Ayeni.